Survival Foods: What to Eat to Endure


Summary

Hey, real quick, just how long did the energy from the previous meal you consumed last? One hour, 2 hours? How long did it take till you got hungry once again? The answers to these have a lot to do with the macronutrient content of what that meal contained. And you should believe this has significant effects for the optimal survival foods for a disaster scenario.


Hey, real quick, just how long did the energy from the previous meal you consumed last? One hour, 2 hours? How long did it take till you got hungry once again? The answers to these have a lot to do with the macronutrient content of what that meal contained. And you should believe this has significant effects for the optimal survival foods for a disaster scenario.

Three kinds of calories, two kinds of energy

As we know, all calories were not created equal. Glancing over any nutrition label, you are likely to see calories at the top. Everything underneath may be classified into calories from one of three main sources, proteins, carbohydrates, and fat. The calories from these three groups have to add up to the total calories in a meal because they are the units of energy that make up a food. All paths result in the same end location: usable energy for your body.

Lipid based energy (ketones)

Earlier in human history, our forefathers used to roam the lands following herds: buffalo, gazelle or perhaps mammoth. We were hunters, so we supplemented this diet with natural herbs and roots we could forage. The meat we would eat from these animals comprised a lot of proteins, but a majority of of the usable calories came from fat, which is a lot denser in energy. Fat is transformed into molecules known as ketones in the bloodstream which are used by cells as fuel. This energy would provide a sustained burn for constant energy; being in a state of using fat as energy is referred to as ketosis. When we had a big kill, or whenever we found fresh fruit to reap, our bodies could store these additional calories as fat.

Carbohydrate based metabolic process (sugar, starch and glucose)

In primitive periods, carbohydrates were scarce. Before civilization, whole grains were not cultivated or processed in an organized way. Crops were not grown as we were nomads. Carbs were available extremely rarely and would have to be stored as fat for the lean periods in advance if they were found. Carbohydrates break apart quickly in a sugar known as glucose which is carried in the blood, boosting blood sugar levels. The hormone insulin works as an essential within the gateways of the body cells allowing glucose to get in.

The trouble with the present day eating plan

The thing is, fat or carbohydrate metabolism are mutually exclusive. Carbs, being unusual for a lot of years of history, are preferentially used by the human body. As modern people, we live in a state of regular harvesting. The body respond to carbohydrates with the objective to store, insulin is released to shuttle them into our cells.

When you analyze the regular American diet, nearly every meal contains carbohydrates. From the bagel at breakfast, to the sandwich at lunch time, to the steak and potatoes for dinner, we regularly eat carbohydrates. This makes us less able to utilize fat as a fuel supply. Transforming into ketosis takes over 7 days for lots of people, and until then the fat on the body can not be used for energy.

When you shut down the faucet for carbs, you are in big trouble from an energy perspective. How can you prevent this, and how will you prepare yourself from being separated from food? More in the following write-up in this sequence.

Thank you so much for reading! Terrance Franklin writes about survival and nutrition on a variety of sites on the web. For more information on survival foods, be sure to check out survival foods. And for even deeper reading, follow the link at survival foods