Sun Health Center for Health & Wellbeing Celebrates Its First Anniversary

SURPRISE, ARIZ. (PRWEB) March 05, 2015

Since its opening last March, the Sun Health Center for Health & Wellbeing has touched the lives of thousands of West Valley residents through health education and fitness classes, support groups and individual consultations designed to help them live longer, healthier lives.

One of those lives is Diana (who asked that her last name be withheld), a 56-year-old Sun City resident whose physician gave her three months to lower her cholesterol and blood pressure or face taking medications to address her symptoms. Diana took several nutrition and exercise-related classes at the center and it paid off.

“I took your teaching about diet and exercise to ‘heart,’ and I wanted you to know my results after those three months,” Diana wrote in an email. “I lost 15-pounds; my total cholesterol went down 30 points to 185 with my HDL (“good” cholesterol) going up 3 points; my triglycerides dropped 25 points and my blood pressure dropped 8 points…my doctor was surprised and very pleased.”

Diana’s story is just one example of positive changes linked to the center (see infographic for more), which is staffed by a full-time registered dietitian/certified diabetes educator; an exercise physiologist/certified health coach and a memory care/dementia expert. In addition, the center contracts with a licensed acupuncturist, several licensed massage therapists, yoga and Tai Chi instructors and a medical director.

The original center opened in Surprise but it recently expanded to two other West Valley communities, Sun City and Litchfield Park. All three centers are located in areas largely populated by adults 65 and older, many of whom have one or more chronic diseases. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), chronic diseases—like heart disease, diabetes, and cancer—are leading causes of death and disability in the United States.

Jennifer Drago, Sun Health’s executive vice president of Population Health, says all of the center’s programs and treatments are rooted in research. “We use evidence-based programs designed to complement physicians’ diagnoses and recommended treatments. We give people, especially those with chronic conditions, tools to help them self-manage their health, make positive lifestyle changes and improve their overall quality of life.”

The center’s staff members see about 100 clients a week (through group classes or 1-on-1 consultations) with services ranging from nutrition counseling, medical nutrition therapy and weight management classes to fitness and exercise classes, acupuncture, massage and medication reviews. Center staff members also provide evidence-based educational programs that address diabetes, pre-diabetes, living with chronic conditions and tobacco cessation.

The Sun Health Center for Health & Wellbeing reflects a national trend toward prevention and wellness services and a growing push for Americans to become more involved in managing their own health.

“Chronic diseases are among the most common and costly of all health problems in the United States,” Drago said. “They are also some of the most preventable. Much of the pain and suffering related to chronic diseases is caused by behaviors that people can change, behaviors such as unhealthy eating and a lack of ...Read More


The Ranch Treatment Center Introduces Equine-Enriched Programming for Men with Co-Occurring Disorders

Nunnelly, TN (PRWEB) March 03, 2015

In January, The Ranch treatment center in Tennessee launched equine-enriched therapy as part of its comprehensive treatment program for men struggling with addiction and co-occurring mental and emotional disorders. The program is housed in a newly renovated eight-bed residence on the beautiful Piney River, called River House.

The program features two equine-assisted therapy groups each week co-facilitated by a primary therapist and equine therapist, an additional equine group every other weekend, as well as opportunities for therapeutic and recreational riding. Therapists who work in the fascinating world of equine-assisted therapy have found that interacting with and caring for horses can provide valuable lessons in accountability, responsibility, communication and relationship-building — things that are often missing in the lives of people who have been derailed by drugs, alcohol, depression, loss and trauma.

“Every day I see clients who have a hard time relating to other people, but who are able connect with a horse and learn new ways of communicating and opening up,” reports Ben Cook, MA, a primary therapist at The Ranch. When clients arrive at The Ranch, they are assigned a horse to care for and to feed twice a day. Caring for and interacting with horses, Cook says, can offer unique lessons and insights about recovery.

The program was developed collaboratively with the clinical team, which includes the program’s equine therapist, Dede Beasley. Beasley is a master’s level clinician with more than three decades of experience in the field of equine-assisted therapy.

“Working with the horses helps our clients learn what it feels like to engage in selfless acts of service without an expectation of anything in return,” says Beasley. The process of working with horses can stir deeply buried emotions and reveal patterns in relationships and in communication.

“The horses can provide lessons in being direct and assertive and asking for what we want or need,” Beasley says.

In addition to equine-assisted therapy, the men’s program offers:


Two-hour group therapy sessions, four times a week
Weekly one-hour sessions with a primary therapy
Weekly one-hour sessions with a trauma therapist
Daily educational groups focused on trauma recovery, addiction recovery and spiritual development
Mindfulness/meditation groups several times each week
Multiple offsite meetings

Additional programming includes information and skills-building in nutrition, body image, fitness, wellness and 12-step principles, depending on the client’s needs.

River House is located on the site of the former Pinewood Plantation Mansion, and is adjacent to the barn that houses the horses used in therapy. The home features a new kitchen, new bathrooms and upgrades throughout. The treatment team at River House offers primary and extended care services for men suffering from emotional and mental health problems, including addiction, mood disorders and anxiety disorders.

About The Ranch Treatment Center

Established in 1999, The Ranch treatment center provides gender-separate therapeutic programs that address the underlying causes ...Read More


Center for Primary Care Celebrates American Heart Month

Evans, GA (PRWEB) February 27, 2015

In honor of American Heart Month in February, Dr. Edwin Scott, from the Center for Primary Care (CPC) South office, is offering tips on how to improve heart health.

Heart disease may be a leading cause of death, but that doesn’t mean people have to accept it as their fate. Although one may lack the power to change some risk factors — such as family history, sex or age — there are some key heart disease prevention steps to take.

Dr. Scott has six helpful tips to improve heart health and prevent heart disease:

1. Don’t smoke or use tobacco

Smoking or using tobacco of any kind is one of the most significant risk factors for developing heart disease. Chemicals in tobacco can damage the heart and blood vessels, leading to narrowing of the arteries (atherosclerosis). The good news, though, is that when one quits smoking, one’s risk of heart disease drops almost to that of a nonsmoker in about five years. No matter how long or how much someone has smoked, they will start reaping rewards as soon as they quit.

2. Exercise for 30 minutes on most days of the week

Getting some regular, daily exercise can reduce the risk of fatal heart disease. When physical activity is combined with other lifestyle measures, such as maintaining a healthy weight, the payoff is even greater. Try getting at least 30 to 60 minutes of moderately intense physical activity most days of the week. It’s not necessary to exercise strenuously to achieve benefits, but there are bigger benefits to increasing the intensity, duration and frequency of workouts.

3. Eat a heart-healthy diet

Eating a healthy diet can reduce the risk of heart disease. A diet rich in fruits, vegetables and whole grains can help protect the heart. Beans, other low-fat sources of protein and certain types of fish also can reduce the risk of heart disease. Limiting certain fats is also important. Heart-healthy eating isn’t all about cutting back, though. Healthy fats from plant-based sources, such as avocado, nuts, olives and olive oil, help the heart by lowering the bad type of cholesterol. Most people need to add more fruits and vegetables to their diet — with a goal of five to 10 servings a day. Eating that many fruits and vegetables can not only help prevent heart disease but may also help prevent cancer and improve diabetes. Eating several servings a week of certain fish, such as salmon and mackerel, may decrease the risk of heart attack.

4. Maintain a healthy weight

Being overweight, especially carrying excess weight around one’s middle, ups the risk of heart disease. Excess weight can lead to conditions that increase the chances of heart disease — high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes. Even a small weight loss can be beneficial. Reducing weight by just 5 to 10 percent can help decrease blood pressure, lower blood cholesterol level and reduce the risk of diabetes.

5. Get enough quality sleep

Sleep deprivation can do more than leave one yawning ...Read More


Center for Primary Care Celebrates American Heart Month

Evans, GA (PRWEB) February 27, 2015

In honor of American Heart Month in February, Dr. Edwin Scott, from the Center for Primary Care (CPC) South office, is offering tips on how to improve heart health.

Heart disease may be a leading cause of death, but that doesn’t mean people have to accept it as their fate. Although one may lack the power to change some risk factors — such as family history, sex or age — there are some key heart disease prevention steps to take.

Dr. Scott has six helpful tips to improve heart health and prevent heart disease:

1. Don’t smoke or use tobacco

Smoking or using tobacco of any kind is one of the most significant risk factors for developing heart disease. Chemicals in tobacco can damage the heart and blood vessels, leading to narrowing of the arteries (atherosclerosis). The good news, though, is that when one quits smoking, one’s risk of heart disease drops almost to that of a nonsmoker in about five years. No matter how long or how much someone has smoked, they will start reaping rewards as soon as they quit.

2. Exercise for 30 minutes on most days of the week

Getting some regular, daily exercise can reduce the risk of fatal heart disease. When physical activity is combined with other lifestyle measures, such as maintaining a healthy weight, the payoff is even greater. Try getting at least 30 to 60 minutes of moderately intense physical activity most days of the week. It’s not necessary to exercise strenuously to achieve benefits, but there are bigger benefits to increasing the intensity, duration and frequency of workouts.

3. Eat a heart-healthy diet

Eating a healthy diet can reduce the risk of heart disease. A diet rich in fruits, vegetables and whole grains can help protect the heart. Beans, other low-fat sources of protein and certain types of fish also can reduce the risk of heart disease. Limiting certain fats is also important. Heart-healthy eating isn’t all about cutting back, though. Healthy fats from plant-based sources, such as avocado, nuts, olives and olive oil, help the heart by lowering the bad type of cholesterol. Most people need to add more fruits and vegetables to their diet — with a goal of five to 10 servings a day. Eating that many fruits and vegetables can not only help prevent heart disease but may also help prevent cancer and improve diabetes. Eating several servings a week of certain fish, such as salmon and mackerel, may decrease the risk of heart attack.

4. Maintain a healthy weight

Being overweight, especially carrying excess weight around one’s middle, ups the risk of heart disease. Excess weight can lead to conditions that increase the chances of heart disease — high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes. Even a small weight loss can be beneficial. Reducing weight by just 5 to 10 percent can help decrease blood pressure, lower blood cholesterol level and reduce the risk of diabetes.

5. Get enough quality sleep

Sleep deprivation can do more than leave one yawning ...Read More